The C Score (2.0)

Archive for the ‘Competition reports’ Category

Coralie Leblond-Chartrand was the surprise winner in the junior all-around at Elite Canada this weekend, at least, according to Gymnastics Canada.

Leblond-Chartrand was actually one of the “Honorable Mention” winners in my Up-and-Coming Juniors series, and with Dominique Pegg and Ti Liu competing with seniors now, it should come as no surprise that Leblond-Chartrand is now one of the best juniors in Canada.

Leblond-Chartrand placed fifth during the 2008 Canadian Championships last summer. During that meet, Pegg was first and Liu third. Anysia Unick placed second, which at that time was surprising since she was otherwise relatively unknown. Leblond-Chartrand was also bested in June by Caitlyn Keates.

Not today. At 53.30 points, Leblond-Chartrand was well ahead of second-place Madeline Gardiner, the 2008 Championships novice champion, and Rochelle Hurt. She had the best score on vault, the second-highest score on beam, and the third-highest scores on bars and floor. I should mention, too, that this is excellent news for Gardiner, who is coming off an impressive novice showing in June, and has shown herself more than ready to be among the junior international elites.

Unick finished a disappointing tenth, while Keates also had a disappointing day, finishing sixth.

Full results are available here.

All-around:

1. Coralie Leblond-Chartrand (53.30)
2. Madeline Gardiner (51.90)
3. Rochelle Hurt (51.40)
4. Mikaela Gerber (50.95)
5. Jimena Lopez (50.65)
6. Caitlyn Keates (50.60)
7. Dominique Nadeau (50.30)
8. Taylor Ricci/Jessica Dowling (49.10)
10. Anysia Unick (49.00)

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Americans Corrie Lothrop, Olivia Courtney and Amanda Jetter swept the medals today at the 4th International Challenge in Woluwé Saint-Lambert near Brussels. Perhaps more importantly, Larisa Iordache, the twelve year-old phenom from Romania, finished only .05 points out of the medals!

Jetter on beam at Woluwé Saint-Lambert

Jetter on beam at Woluwé Saint-Lambert

This is another impressive showing for Lothrop and Courtney, who also competed extremely well at the PAGU Individual Event Championships earlier this fall. Lothrop, of course, was an alternate for the Olympic team, and Courtney is doing quite well also — she finished only .3 behind Lothrop. Also good to see Jetter out there.

Courtney has a great floor. Her second pass, a full in, nearly went out of the field of Dutchfan’s camera. She fell on her third pass, though, an Arabian double front. Without this fall, she would have had gold! A few wobbles on beam, and the form is still a little off, but solid double pike dismount.

it <em>was</em> MLT screeching

Thanks to USAG for the visual confirmation: it was MLT screeching

On floor, Lothrop nearly fell — but managed to not put her hands down — on a 2.5-front layout. Otherwise, nice routine, although I’m not a huge fan of the music choice. Jetter also had a very nice floor — although, is that MLT screaming in the background? Kind of ruins it. It’s hard not to like this girl. She has nice lines. And powerful for someone so tiny.

The participants at Woluwé Saint-Lambert

The participants at Woluwé Saint-Lambert

The field of fifteen was not particularly strong, but was still exciting. Of the listed participants, I do know that Emilie Ibragimova of Belgium had to scratch at the last minute because of a hamspring injury.

Tahnee Masela, Wyomi Masela’s sister, did not compete on vault and finished last. Honestly, though, there is not a gymnast out there whose style does not remind me more of Shawn Johnson. Check out this floor routine. For the first half, there are almost no pauses, which is refreshing. A little too powerful though, puts her hands down.

Speaking of sisters, Lieke Wevers, whose sister Sanne competes today on beam at the World Cup Final, finished a strong sixth with a very expressive floor routine.

The Romanians, besides Iordache, finished well out of the medals, but then they are much younger than many of the other competitors.

And then there’s Iordache. What can I say? Her floor routine is unbelievable! If she cleans up those landings — she propels herself almost too much — this thing is crazy. Check out the 1.5-punch front-punch front. More importantly, the choreography is incredible. Whoever did this should be doing all of the Romanian routines.

The event was filmed by Dutchfan and Gymcat.

Full results are here.

All-around:

1. Corrie Lothrop (58.35)
2. Olivia Courtney (58.05)
3. Amanda Jetter (57.10)
4. Larisa Iordache (57.05)
5. Jolien Eggermont (55.45)
6. Lieke Wevers (55.30)
7. Jocelyn Kraan (53.95)
8. Marrit Ewald (53.55)
9. Marieke Herteller (52.45)
10 Ana Maria Baicu (52.05)
11. Monica Dejardin (50.90)
12. Patricia Tiron (49.45)
13. Kim Van Limbergen (49.35)
14. Mihaela David (47.80)
15. Tahnee Masela (38.80)

The first day of the World Cup Final is over, and here’s the sitch:

Cheng Fei wins!

Cheng Fei wins!

Vault:

Cheng Fei, unsurprisingly, took vault with a DTY and a laid-out Podkopayeva for a 15.050. Ariella Kaeslin took second with a Rudi and a 1.5 Yurchenko, losing to Fei by less than .05 (she finished with a 14.912), although naturally Fei didn’t pull out her biggest vaults. And Aagje Vanwalleghem took third with a 14.425, just over Elsa Garcia‘s 14.400. It appears that Vanwalleghem and Garcia actually had aBeijing uneven bars finals moment: they had the same A-scores and B-scores, but Vanwalleghem won.

Elena Zamolodchikova performed a DTY and a Yurchenko half-on 1.5-off but sat both down to finish sixth. (The second was also devalued to piked.) Apparently, though, she’s in shape, which I believe means better than she was at DTB.

Hiu Ying Angel Wong finished last with a full-twisting Tsukahara and a handspring front tuck, which she fell on. On the other hand, it was the first time a Hong Kong gymnast had made the WCF. Jana Komrskova also had an off day, after giving up her spot in Beijing to younger gymnasts, with a Yurchenko half on tucked one-half off and a Yurchenko full. IG seemed to suggest that she was not at her top level, despite being in shape.

Honestly, we all knew the vault final wouldn’t be very interesting, and that Cheng would win. The next highest-ranked person was Zamolodchikova, who didn’t seem to be in top form at DTB. Despite being ranked above Kaeslin, Komrskova has been out of competition for quite a while, so it was hard to imagine her being in top competition form. Apparently Garcia got the most applause of everyone — I know a lot of people were excited to see Mexico’s best gymnast ever back in competition! I certainly was. Too bad she missed the medals. I’m happy to see Vanwalleghem come away with the bronze, especially after turning down the International Challenge in Belgium that was also taking place this weekend. This is Belgium’s first WCF medal.

What vaults did we see? Obviously Cheng wasn’t going to perform her hardest stuff in this field. She did a DTY and a laid-out Yurchenko half-on 1.5 off, which gave her actually only the second-highest combined A-score (5.8+5.6=11.4), after Kaeslin. Kaeslin performed a Rudi and a 1.5-twisting Yurchenko, for an A-score of 11.8. The only other person besides Cheng to perform a DTY was Zamolodchikova, who complemented it with a Yurchenko half-on 1.5-off (recorded as piked), for a combined A-score of 11. Unfortunately she was not able to exploit that A-score with a high enough B-score, landing on her knees on both. Garcia, Boczogo and Vanwalleghem also all performed 1.5-twisting Yurchenkos. Garcia and Vanwalleghem then both performed a piked Yurchenko half-on 1.5-off to Boczogo’s handspring front one-half piked, giving them a .2 advantage over Boczogo. (Boczogo also fell on her 1.5 Yurchenko.) Komrskova and Wong had the lowest A-scores: Komrskova did a tucked Yurchenko half-on 1.5-off for a 10.0 A-score; and Wong did a full-twisting Tsukahara and a handspring front tuck, which honestly is a junior vault (A-score is 4.4) for a total of 8.6 A-score.

We actually saw more diversity in vaults than we would see in the average vault competition, but vault still remains the most boring event. The only competitive vaults performed were: DTY, Rudi, 1.5 Yurchenko and Cheng’s laid-out Yurchenko one-half on 1.5-off. Everything else we wouldn’t usually see from the creme de la creme of vaulters. If there’s any apparatus on which I’d like to see a burst of originality, it’s vault.

The Chinese could have swept on bars, but Yang Yillin scratched at the last minute

The Chinese could have swept on bars, but Yang Yillin scratched at the last minute

Uneven bars:

Honestly, the biggest surprise on bars was Yang Yilin’s scratch — with a “waist” (lower back) injury, according to Lu Shanzhen, which sounds like a pulled muscle. Apparently it is not serious. I certainly hope not! The title went to He Kexin with a 16.250, unsurprisingly, followed by Jiang Yuyuan, over .5 behind (15.700). Bronze went to Koko Tsurumi, who has really just amazed me recently. She was nearly .5 behind Jiang, but far ahead of Dariya Zgoba, who took fourth.

Apparently He’s routine was a little shaky. She had trouble on the 1/1 on the low bar, which has actually given her trouble in the past, but did her Jaeger combo, etc. — she competed full difficulty, with a 7.7 A-score. Interestingly, she received B-scores in the 7.5 to 9 range, which is pretty huge. Not sure what happened there. The top three had by far the highest A-scores, which I think tends to be the case on uneven bars more than on any other apparatus. Jiang was also in the 7’s (7.1) and Tsurumi had a 6.8.

Ouch (Koval)

Ouch (Koval)

The next highest score was Zgoba with a 6.2, then Anastasia Koval and Jana Sikulova with 6.0s. Koval finished a disappointing seventh after landing her head on the bar on a Stadler toe-on piked Tkatchev. Yikes. Zgoba also had a mistake, on her Pak to Stadler, on which she went the wrong direction. She actually had the same problem (on a different skill) on one of her routines at Beijing. Sikulova’s routine hasn’t changed much recently; I find it pretty boring, if technically correct. She finished fifth.

The disappointment of the day was probably for Daniele Hypolito, who honestly isn’t very strong on bars anyway. She finished with an 11.875 — ouch. She fell on two different elements — transition to high bar, when her feet slipped; and a Stadler. Apparently her score was also lowered by three tenths for some kind of neutral deduction, but I’m not sure what it was.

I think overall that bars always promised to be more interesting than vault. The three Chinese competitors (which went down to two went Yang scratched), were actually not ranked at the top of the list because they are relatively new competitors. We knew He was going to win, and that it was all but certain that Jiang would place. He could have had a fall and that still would not have made up the difference in A-score between her and Tsurumi. Anyway, there were two Ukrainians in the final. We know they have a beautiful bars heritage — and both are quite lovely on bars — but they are inconsistent and have fairly humdrum routines. It was great to see Sikulova — kind of like it was great to see Komrskova and Boczogo — but I didn’t really expect a medal for her.

As for originality, I was surprised when I made my bars Top 8 list to discover that bars have ultimately been pretty boring recently. Take a look at the dismounts we saw today: three double fronts, three double layouts. He did the only unique (by which I mean, not done by anyone else at this meet) dismount, a Tsukahara.

The FIG:

Yesterday when I read that the FIG was doing a “live broadcast,” I took them at their word, but in fact I was slightly unconvinced because there was no information about where you might see it. I wish the FIG would hire a publicity person for the Web site whose first language is English. (“Broadcast” is not the same as “commentary,” among other things) Seriously.

I don’t hate the FIG nearly as much as other people, but honestly IG‘s coverage was far superior to FIG’s. The FIG’s commentary was barely live — it was consistently far behind what IG was posting, and far less complete. (And, incidentally, the IG coverage was also done by a non-native English speaker.)

Also, do you think the photo galleries have been updated? The answer is no.

Here's hoping Sandra Izbasa (seen here Friday during podium training) takes gold on floor

Here's hoping Sandra Izbasa (seen here Friday during podium training) takes gold on floor

Tomorrow:

Tomorrow we see beam and floor finals. We’ll finally get to see Sandra Izbasa, and Cheng will be competing for two more golds, both of which are entirely within her reach. It will be exciting to see Li Shanshan on beam, especially after all the rumors flying around about her weight gain and return to her provincial team. Meanwhile, Hypolito and Zamolodchikova both have a shot at redemption (Hypolito on both events, Zamolodchikova on floor). But honestly I don’t think Hypolito’s beam will medal, and while she is powerful on floor, I really dislike the sloppiness (also true of Daiane dos Santos and sometimes Lais Souza — it’s a problem). I don’t imagine Zamolodchikova will pull it off, but it would certainly be exciting. On beam we’ll also see Lauren Mitchell, who is lovely on that event, as well as Sanne Wevers who is just so clean. And finally, perhaps the part I’m looking forward to the most: Jiang’s floor.

See you then!

Vault:

1. Cheng Fei (15.050)
2. Ariella Kaeslin (14.912)
3. Aagje Vanwalleghem (14.425)
4. Elsa Garcia (14.400)
5. Dorina Boczogo (13.787)
6. Elena Zamolodchikova (13.475)
7. Jana Komrskova (13.262)
8. Hiu Ying Angel Wong (12.712)

Uneven bars:

1. He Kexin (16.250)
2. Jiang Yuyuan (15.700)
3. Koko Tsurumi (15.250)
4. Dariya Zgoba (14.500)
5. Jana Sikulova (14.300)
6. Anastasia Koval (13.625)
7. Daniele Hypolito (11.875)

While the rest of the world looks to the World Cup Final, which starts in just a few hours in Madrid, the Canadian gymnastics community had its eyes focused on Gatineau.

Brittany Rogers, 2008 Elite Canada champion

Brittany Rogers, 2008 Elite Canada champion

In the senior competition that took place Friday, Brittany Rogers took gold in the all-around, with Sydney Sawa and Charlotte Mackie rounding out the medals.

The junior all-around will take place Saturday, with junior and senior event finals to be contested on Sunday.

Rogers’ win should not come as a surprise. She placed second at Gymnix and sixth at Pacific Rim this year, and first in the Canadian Junior Championships last year. At this competition, she had the highest score on three events, all except floor, which went to Mackie. Mackie is also not a surprise: she was third at Yokohama and fourth at Gymnix and Pacific Rim. She also had the second-highest score on beam.

Sawa is a bit older than the other two. She competed at the 2007 World Championships, and took fifth at Gymnix as a senior this year. She was fifth in the senior division at the 2008 Canadian Championships. Sawa was second on all events except beam, where she was sixth. Not sure what happened there.

The one big Canadian senior we didn’t see is Peng Peng Lee, who is injured. Lee has also been dealing with the sudden closing of her training gym.

Also competing were Dominique Pegg, in her first senior competition, and Ti Liu. Pegg finished a strong fourth, nearly two points ahead of fifth-place Cynthia Lemieux Ti, unfortunately, did not compete four events, scratching on floor. Sky Corbett-Methot finished ninth.

The juniors compete tomorrow. Among them will be Anysia Unick, second at this year’s Junior Championships. Also competing will be Caitlin Keates and Coralie Leblond-Chartrand. All of them, including the new seniors Pegg and Liu, are discussed in my Up-and-Coming Junior series here. We’ll also see the 2008 novice champion Madeline Gardiner.

Full results here.

All-around:

1. Brittany Rogers (56.35)
2. Sydney Sawa (55.40)
3. Charlotte Mackie (54.90)
4. Dominique Pegg (53.90)
5. Cynthia Lemieux (51.00)
6. Laurie-Eve Gagne-Pepin (50.30)
7. Miranda Meyer (50.20)
8. Catherine Dion (50.15)

With the World Cup Final coming up, it’s easy to forget that anothe interesting competition will be taking place in Belgium at Woluwé Saint-Lambert near Brussels.

The participating countries are Holland, Belgium, Romania and the United States.

Corrie Lothrop (USA)

Corrie Lothrop (USA)

United States:

The United States will be sending Corrie Lothrop, Amanda Jetter and Olivia Courtney.

Lothrop, of course, was an alternate for the 2008 Olympic team, and is coming off of an impressive performance at the PAGU Individual Event Championships in Argentina, where she took gold on vault and silver on all three other events. Courtney also had a good meet at PAGU, taking second on vault and first on floor. This is Jetter’s first international event. She qualified to the National Team for the first time this year, placing fifth in the all-around.

Larisa Iordache (ROM)

Larisa Iordache (ROM)

Romania:

The Romanian participants are Ana Maria Baicu, Larisa Iordache, Patricia Tiron and Mihaela David

We all know plenty about Iordache, the twelve-year-old Romanian superstar who was first in her age level at last year’s Romanian National Championships, though she fell to second this year. Iordache was at Top Gym earlier this fall, where she took first on floor. She’s got a nice routine with good choreography and expressiveness, especially for a young Romanian. She was fourth in the all-around. Baicu was third in the Romanian nationals in her age group this year after taking fifth last year. Baicu was third in the all-around and on floor at the November Tournoi de Blanc-Mesnil, after Natalia Kononenko and Diana Bulimar. Tiron was eighth in the all-around at that competition, where she also took first on beam. David is a teammate of Iordache and Baicu at Dinamo Bucharest.

Wyomi Masela (NED)

Wyomi Masela (NED)

Holland:

Holland sends Jocelyn Kraan, Ewald Marrit, Lieke Wevers, Tahnee Masela, Wyomi Masela and Natasja Blind.

Wevers, Sanne Wevers’ sister, was third in the Dutch National Championships last year (after Suzanne Harmes and Sanne), with Marrit taking fourth. The Masela sisters are both very good, and Wyomi specifically is coming off of two excellent competitions: at the Massilia Cup, where she placed first on vault, and at the Tournoi d’Arques, where she was the all-around champion. Blind also competed at Massilia, but took no medals. She was, however, fifth at the WOGA Classic (tied with Australia’s Britt Greeley) last March. Kraan was sixth at Top Gym this year.

Belgium:

The participants for Belgium are Kim Van Limbergen, Jolien Eggermont, Marieke Herteleer, Monica Dejardin and Emilie Ibragimova. Aagje Vanwalleghem was scheduled to compete but withdrew after moving into qualifying position for the vault competition at the WCF.

I don’t know much about the the Belgian gymnasts to be honest, although Emilie Ibragimova was at Arques recently. Feel free to enlighten me in the comments!

With the advertised star of the Tournoi d’Arques Tatiana Nabieva out with a heel injury, Irina Sazonova and Wyomi Masela were able to truly shine, taking the senior and junior competitions, respectively.

Meanwhile, the Dutch gymnast Tess Moonen took first in the espoir competition (France’s category of elite gymnasts a step below international elite) with a solid 55, qualifying for all event finals. Masela, meanwhile, turned in a solid 57.800, beating Sazonova’s score of 55.525. Masela also went on to take first on vault and second on floor in event finals.

(Note that there were two categories for event finals, so each one had two girls placing for each medal. If I understand correctly, gymnasts ranked first or second on an event in the Espoir category made the A final, while third and fourth place made the B final. For juniors and seniors, the top six made the A final unless both gymnasts from the same team made the A final, in which case only the top gymnast did and the other went to the B final. Why exactly? I don’t know.)

Diana Sapronova at Arques

Diana Sapronova (RUS), on floor at the Tournoi Arques, took second in the junior all-around and golds on three apparatus finals

Sazonova’s teammate Diana Sapronova took second in the all-around in the junior competition and first on bars, beam and floor in the A final, while Sazonova took first on beam, but finished only seventh and sixth, respectively, on bars and floor finals, all in the B finals.

France’s Léa Kemayou had a rather poor outing, unfortunately, placing only seventh in the junior all-around, sixth on bars and fourth on beam in the B finals. However, Doriane Thobie, a newcomer, was an impressive fourth in the all-around (Espoir) and an impressive third on beam in the B final, the best showing by France all day!

You’ll remember Masela as the Dutch junior who recently took first on vault at the Massilia Cup. Sazonova has been around for quite a while — I believe she is now 17 — but we haven’t seen much of her, besides at the 2005 WOGA Classic and the 2007 Russian Cup.

Georgiana Gheorghe (ROM), on floor at the Tournoi d'Arques, placed second in the Espoir all-around

Georgiana Gheorghe (ROM), on floor at the Tournoi d'Arques, placed second in the Espoir all-around

Georgiana Gheorghe of Romania took first on floor in the B final, the only medal for the Romanian gymnasts as the other competitor, the promising Diana Bulimar competed only on bars due to an ankle injury (Bulimar placed fourth on bars in the B final). As a combined team, however, the girls finished 13th out of 14th in the Espoir competition because Bulimar had to scratch on three of four apparatus. Gheorghe, however, finished second in the all-around.

Besides Masela’s great performance, the Dutch had a quite good day overall. Their teams went two-three in the junior/senior competition and took first in the Espoir competition. Naoual Ouazani Chahdi finished third in the junior all around and took second on beam in the B-finals, while Fiehe Willens placed third in the senior all-around and second on A-side vault.

Wyomi Masela (NED) was the big winner in the junior division at the Tournoi d'Arques

Wyomi Masela (NED) was the big winner in the junior division at the Tournoi d'Arques

Moonen and Tessa Gerrits took first in the Espoir team competition, and Moonen finished first, as I mentioned, in the all-around, by nearly four points over Gheorghe. On the A-side of event finals, they finished 1-2-3 on vault (Masela, Willens, Moonen). They placed at least one competitor in seven of the eight event finals. On the A-side, Marlies Rijken and Sanne de Smet went 2-3 on bars, and de Smet also took third on beam. Masela, of course, took second on floor. On the B-side, Willens and Lisa van den Burg went 1-2 on bars, Ouazani Chahdi took second on beam, as I mentioned, and Gerrits and van den Burg took second and third, respectively, on floor.

Finally, I should mention Argentina’s Virginie Florence Deluzio, who finished second in the senior all-around. Poland’s Marta Pihan also competed, but placed a relatively disappointing fifth in the senior all-around.

Overall, the Dutch overperformed while the Russians underperformed somewhat (though they competed none of their big players). Generally speaking, though, the level of competition was not particularly high.

Before the results, Masela’s floor (from AMGA’s much-appreciated but low-quality streamed coverage):

More videos are available from youtube user samaraGW here.

Combined senior/junior team:

1. St. Petersburg, Russia (Diana Sapronova/Irina Sazonova)
2. Pro Patria Zoetermeer, Netherlands (Naoual Ouazani Chahdi/Lisa van den Burg)
3. Bosan TON Almelo, Netherlands (Wyomi Masela, Sanne de Smet)

Espoir team:

1. Netherlands (Tessa Gerrits/Tess Moonen)
2. Belgium (Antje van de Velde/Eline Vandersteen)
3. Créteil, FRA (Doriane Thobie/Cindy Bacquet)

Senior all-around:

1. Irina Sazonova (RUS) – 55.25
2. Virginie Florence Deluzio (ARG) – 53.7
3. Fiehe Willens (NED) – 51.25

Junior all-around:

1. Wyomi Masela (NED) – 57.8
2. Diana Sapronova (RUS) – 57.4
3. Naoual Ouazani Chahdi (NED) – 55.9

Espoir all-around:

1. Tess Moonen (NED) – 55.1
2. Georgiana Gheorghe (ROM) – 51.65
3. Antje van de Velde (BEL) – 51.6

Vault A:

1. Wyomi Masela (NED)
2. Fiehe Willems (NED)
3. Tess Moonen (NED)

Vault B:

1. Alexandra Herrala (FIN)
2. Melita Cesnavicuite (LIT)
3. Reeta Pietlia (FIN)

Uneven bars A:

1. Diana Sapronova (RUS)
2. Marlies Rijken (NED)
3. Sanne de Smet (NED)

Uneven bars B:

1. Fiehe Willens (NED)
2. Lisa van den Burg (NED)
3. Emilie Ibragimova (BEL)

Beam A:

1. Diana Sapronova (RUS)
2. Reeta Pietila (FIN)
3. Sanne de Smet (NED)

Beam B:

1. Irina Sazonova (RUS)
2. Naoual Ouazani Chahdi (NED)
3. Doriane Thobie (FRA)

Floor A:

1. Diana Sapronova (RUS)
2. Wyomi Masela (NED)
3. Antje van de Velde (BEL)

Floor B:

1. Georgiana Gheorghe (ROM)
2. Tessa Gerrits (NED)
3. Lisa van den Burg (NED)

We can basically totally predict the competitors for the WCF at this point. Probably the biggest question mark remains vault. Here are the most recent lists from the FIG:

Vault:

Cheng Fei
Elena Zamolodchikova
Jana Kormskova
Ariella Kaeslin
Dorina Boczogo
Hong Su Jong*
Aagje Vanwalleghem
Yong Mi Kang*

Unsurprisingly, we’re waiting on the North Koreans. Generally speaking, they don’t usually show up for World Cup events, but who knows what Leonid Arkayev has up his sleeve. Yong Mi Kang is definitely in competitive condition, as I have already mentioned — she recently won vault at the 2008 Asian Games. However, Hong Un Jong has already declined, so we might want to count these two out. This is the prediction about which I’m least confident. Marissa King (19th) is up next, followed by Elsa Garcia (20th). If not them, we would move on to Maria Kostyuchenko (21st) and Kim Bui (22nd). Kostyuchenko was at the Slovenian World Cup in April, but I have no idea where she is now. Bui is clearly ready, but I guess I would predict King and Garcia at this point .

Uneven bars:

Dariya Zgoba
He Kexin
Jana Sikulova
Yang Yilin
Anastasia Koval
Jiang Yuyuan
Koko Tsurumi*
Daria Joura*

I’m pretty confident that Koko Tsurumi will compete, and that Daria Joura will not. This leaves one more place. That would go to … Daniele Hypolito (20th), who is already going to Madrid, so we can count this one settled hopefully.

Beam:

Cheng Fei
Sandra Izbasa
Li Shanshan
Yulia Lozhecko
Daniele Hypolito
Lauren Mitchel
Dariya Zgoba
Chellsie Memmel*

There is no way Chellsie Memmel is showing up to the WCF that I can conceive of, so let’s count her out. That moves Alina Kozich (21st) up, and as she will already be in Spain, she looks to be it.

Floor:

Cheng Fei
Sandra Izbasa
Jiang Yuyuan
Alina Kozich
Suzanne Harmes
Daniele Hypolito
Elena Zamolodchikova
Deng Linlin*
Naomi Ruiz (Spain’s nominee)

Deng Lilin is reportedly fairly seriously injured, so her participation is unlikely. We can almost definitely skip over Jana Bieger and can definitely skip Cassy Vericel, Steliana Nistor and Oksana Chusovitina for injury and retirement, which moves up Koko Tsurumi (23rd) to the next place, as I’ve mentioned before. I would peg her as a likely participant.


About The C Score

First there was A score and B score, now D score and E score. Where is the C score? Right here. In the form of my random thoughts about women's artistic gymnastics.

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