The C Score (2.0)

Posts Tagged ‘Diana Sapronova

Viktoria Komova had a big day at the Mikhail Voronin Cup, a small international competition featuring gymnasts from former Soviet states (for women, Russia, Kazhakstan, Latvia and Ukraine were represented).

Komova finished with a final score of 61.250, over three points above her nearest competitor, Diana Sapronova and over a point above Kristina Goryunova, the gold medalist in the senior all-around.

Komova — Vera Kolesnikova’s daughter — and Goryunova recently competed on the same team at the Massilia Cup, where they finished second in team finals with Aliya Mustafina. Massilia Cup champion Irina Sazonova placed only fourth in the all-around.

Komova is one to watch. She was third in my series of Up-and-coming juniors because of her excellent placement at Pacific Rim and the WOGA Classic this year (third in both).

Check out how the press release describes her gymnastics: “Her gymnastics is practically irreproachable. Precise. Beautiful.”

The Russians do have a tendency towards verbal dramatics. But still.

Komova’s victory notwithstanding, Sapronova is one to watch. She recently placed second at the Massilia Cup. Anastasia Novikova is also promising, particularly on vault.

Also present for the junior competition was Latvia’s Laura Svilpaite, who was the first reserve for bar finals at Europeans this year. (She would have been ranked much higher had it not been for a fall.) Check out her Pak salto.

Senior all-around:

1. Kristina Goryunova (59.950)
2. Anna Mizdrikova (58.400)
3. Jana Demianchuk (57.150)
4. Irina Sazonova (55.000)
5. Angela Golovina (51.700)
6. Karina Topalova (51.650)

Junior all-around:

1. Viktoria Komova (61.250)
2. Diana Sapronova (58.000)
3. Anastasia Novikova (57.900)
4. Diana Sviridova (57.350)
5. Laura Svilpaite (56.700)
6. Galina Ivanetz (56.150)

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You’ll recall that the gymnasts of St. Petersburg were recently in Dreux, before heading to the Tournoi d’Arques, for an exhibition.

youtube user PPLovesGym has posted a playlist of their performances! Very nice.

Some highlights:

  • Tatiana Nabieva’s bars. We weren’t able to see her at Arques because of her ankle injury, and she’s actually pretty low on her Gienger (and only does a layout dismount), but she has such nice lines!
  • An expressive floor routine from newcomer Olga Vilkova. Falls to hands on double pike mount and double tuck dismount. But still, our first look at her.
  • Ekaterina Kramarenko on floor! Her floor is often overlooked.

      And others from Olga Alekseeva, Diana Sapronova and Irina Sazonova.

It used to be that Russia desperately wanted to be like France. Remember Peter and Catherine the Great? St. Petersburg? All those Russians hanging out in Paris in the 19th century?

Now it’s France’s turn. A whole crop of young Russian gymnasts are in France for the annual “gala” of St. Petersburg gymnasts, held in Dreux on November 29th, and the Tournoi d’Arques, to be held this weekend.

Olga Vilkova

Olga Vilkova

Naturally, one Russian competitor stands out above the rest: Junior European Champion Tatiana Nabieva. Everyone was excited to see her in Dreux, but she has a (relatively minor) heel injury, and only did an exhibition on bars to rest herself a bit for Arques. Meanwhile, Ekaterina Kramarenko was also present and looking happy. Olga Alexeeva, Polina Miller, Diana Sapronova, Irina Sazona and the tiny Olga Vilkova (twelve years old, in her international debut) also participated at Dreux. Vilkova is totally adorable, though I don’t know much about her.

These girls will also move next to Arques, along with Ekaterina Krilova, Alina Ribalova and Ksenia Povilaynen.

They’ll be joined there by gymnasts from a number of other countries, as listed here on the Web site of the FFG.

There are lots of lesser-known (to say the least) gymnastics countries, including for instance Algeria. However, we’ll also see Georgiana Gheorghe and Madalina Neagu of Romania and supposedly gymnasts from Canada and Brazil, although that is unconfirmed. As you can see from the poster, the tournament directors are not playing down Nabieva’s presence.

Gheorghe was third in the Romanian Junior Nationals Category III competition this year, after Andreea Tufa and Larisa Iordache. Neagu was second in Category II, behind Diana Bulimar.


About The C Score

First there was A score and B score, now D score and E score. Where is the C score? Right here. In the form of my random thoughts about women's artistic gymnastics.

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